Construction workers must submit to instant drug tests

Australian building and construction industry workers will have to submit to random drug of abuse (DOA) instant drug tests

Australian building and construction industry workers will have to submit to random drug of abuse (DOA) instant drug tests

Australian building and construction industry workers will have to submit to random drug of abuse (DOA) instant drug tests (instant narcotics and alcohol testing) following a ruling by that country’s peak workplace relations tribunal, Fair Work Australia (FWA).

The ruling by the full bench of FWA is binding on all building and construction industry workers and came after an employee on a road-widening project refusing to submit to DOA instant drug tests when requested to do so by his employer.

The Master Builders Association of Victoria (MBAV), the local chapter of the national body which claims more than 31,000 member companies, welcomed the DOA instant drug tests decision, calling it a “landmark” workplace health and safety decision.

“We’re not moving paper clips here, we’re moving heavy machinery and cranes. This is a giant leap forward for the building industry”, Victoria executive director Brian Welch said.

Though instant drug tests and alcohol tests have been permitted for some time, the ruling by the full bench strips away any ambiguity contained in individual workplace agreements between unions and employers regarding DOA instant drug tests.

In handing down its decision on drug of abuse instant drug tests the tribunal said: “The risks to employee safety posed by drug and alcohol use have long been recognized by this tribunal and compulsory drug and alcohol testing is, of itself, not so extraordinary that it could not be argued to be a reasonable employer instruction.”

Australia’s largest construction, forestry and forest products, and mining and energy production trade union, the CFMEU, has yet to respond to the ruling, though it is on record as having said in the past that it was concerned about instant drug tests and alcohol testing because it was against the workplace agreement on the freeway widening project.

However, Mr Welch said MBAV is aware of drug use in the Australian building industry, with speed (amphetamine-based drugs such as methamphetamine) said to be the most common because it is claimed to be the least detectable of all drugs of abuse.

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HIV Home Kit DOA instant drug tests are an immunochromatography-based one step in vitro screening test for qualitative determination of drug substances in human urine specimens and capable of testing for up to 12 drugs of abuse (DOA) from a single urine sample, including amphetamine-based drugs such as speed.

Depending on the requirements of the employer, HIV Home Kit instant drug tests can be supplied as a DOA Drug of Abuse instant drug tests panel card, a DOA Drug of Abuse instant drug tests Dip panel, or a DOA Drug of Abuse instant drug tests cup.

For amphetamine-based drugs such as speed, the HIV Home Kit instant drug test is capable of detecting levels as low as 1,000 ng/ml of d-amphetamine.

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John Le Fevre

Editor at Photo-journ.com
John Le Fevre is an Australian national with more than 30 years' experience as a journalist, photographer, videographer and copy editor. He has spent extensive periods of time working in Africa and throughout Southeast Asia and previously held senior editorial staff positions with various Southeast Asia English language publications and international news agencies. He has covered major world events including the 1991 pillage riots in Zaire, the 1994 Rwanda genocide, the 1999 East Timor independence unrest, the 2004 Asian tsunami, the 2009 Songkran riots in Bangkok, and the 2010 ant-government Bangkok protests. In 1995 he was a Walkley Award finalist, the highest awards in Australian journalism, for his coverage of the 1995 Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo) Ebola outbreak.

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